Friday, January 27, 2017

Colored Bits

I'm moving along with CSDiscoveries and this week continued with lesson 6 called Processing with Bits.  This lesson was awesome!! My students really enjoyed going through all the levels and figuring them out in pairs.  They used the pixel filtering tool to explore how colors are represented using on/off options and combinations. I tried to make the connection to previous lessons (L4 - what is a computer?; L5 - representing with binary) explicit so that students could connect what they did with the face up/down challenge to input/processing/output and representing information using binary in this lesson. I did not go into colors, binary, and computers, but just treated this lesson at face-value and had students go through the leveled puzzles that were scaffolded really well. The initial task of identifying the 8 colors along with their 'binary representation' was important and students could use that to refer to as they completed the subsequent puzzle levels. I ended up making a chart on the board with the different levels listed and as pairs of students finished, I had them write their names so I could conference with them and chat with them about their work for that level. I found that this helped to move things along for students who were capable of doing so while allowing me to meet and talk with those who needed support. The students really liked figuring out the different challenges and were able to make connections from what they were doing in this lesson to previous ones. The only tricky parts for some students was identifying the numbered bits (1st, 2nd, 3rd). Otherwise, they did very well and even then, not all students found this to be difficult. 

In reflecting on this lesson, here are some thoughts that arose:
-What parts of solving this problem on a computer were harder than just doing it by hand?
Trying to make some of the designs on the computer are easier than doing them by hand. For example if you tried to make Mario by drawing him it would be hard to get the right colors. If you wanted to change a color you would have to change everything and all the bits which would be very confusing.
-What parts of solving this problem on a computer were easier than just doing it by hand?
The coloring process might have been easier if you did the more simpler designs like just coloring something red. 
-What parts of solving this problem on a computer were harder than just doing it by hand?
The parts that were harder was that it was hard to have to keep guessing and checking. You had to pick colors and if it wasn't right, you had to go back and pick different colors . That's what was hard because it took us a while to do all 7 of them. It took about 10-15 minutes for each of them . That is why it was harder than just doing it by hand. 
-What parts of solving this problem on a computer were easier than just doing it by hand?
The part that was the easiest was that you can change the colors with just a simple click. In real life, you can't change black into blue by just clicking something.

Here is a sample creation at the end of the lesson where students could apply the pixel filtering tool to different images to see how the filters affect the output images:
I think a challenge in this lesson was providing students with just the right support that each of them needed. Some were just fine going through it on their own whereas others needed more explanation and modeling.
One change I might recommend is modifying the journal to more closely align with the big picture of computers inputting, processing, outputting and storing information. This seems to be important and useful vocabulary to keep revisiting beginning from lesson 4 and continuing in lessons 7,8, and 9.

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