Saturday, January 21, 2017

I'm a pilot!

With the new year, comes new challenges and...new curriculum that I am piloting this semester. I am so excited that Code.org's long-awaited computer science curriculum for 7th-9th graders is here. It's called CS Discoveries. At its heart, it truly has the middle schooler in mind. With a focus on personal expression through a project-based approach, it is appealing to this age range and there desire to express their unique perspectives, interests, and goals. It is designed to be accessible to every learner, and provides the perfect transition to typed code from block programming. At the same time, the tools used in this course such as App Lab and Game Lab are open-ended enough to be engaging for all students, regardless of programming background. Physical computing is also integrating into this course, providing students with the opportunities to 'make things happen' with an Arduino platform. The heartbeat of the course is the problem-solving process which is integrated throughout the course in different contexts. Whether the students are posing questions, creating an app, programming a game, or analyzing data, they learn firsthand to become active persistent problem-solvers.

Here is the link to Unit 1 - Problem Solving - Computers and Logic. Clicking on each of the individual numbered lessons will take you to a lesson plan within this unit.

Part of being a pilot means that I reflect on a lesson that I teach each week. Here is my reflection from week 1 of piloting Unit 1, lesson 3:

I taught this lesson to 6th graders in Phoenix, AZ. This lesson built really well off of the previous lessons on the problem-solving process. It took me three days to get through the entire lesson (about 40 minutes per day). I did the word search and birthday guests party together in one lesson, then took two days to do the road trip problem. Overall, the students were really engaged in this lesson. They liked the challenge of when I timed them doing the word search and birthday guests problem. I thought that having them complete the activity guide after doing each problem and reflecting on how they used each step of the problem-solving process was critical in order to really get them thinking explicitly about what they were doing through the process. I also had them reflect on how the word search and birthday guests problem differed from the road trip problem (more vs. less well-defined/open-ended, etc.). That led to an interesting discussion about how problems are not always precisely laid out and solutions require creativity. 
I tried to closely follow the lesson plan as written, though next time, I would probably wait to show them the trip planning tool until after the groups had time to set out their criteria. It seemed like once I showed them the online tool, that was it! They just wanted to get right into 'doing' and it was hard to bring them back to establishing criteria.



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